MRI and EHS

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MRI and EHS

dteshome85@gmail.com
Curious what your experiences/thoughts are of
MRi while having sensitivity to wifi,cell phones?

Dr Kruse mentioned that With contrast the mri isn’t safe if your sensitive

I would like to rule out MS or another nuerlogical condition that
May be associated with ehs

Perhaps getting disability and
Going to a quieter zone but i am
Sensitive to wifi and concerned
Anout MRI

Thanks
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Re: MRI and EHS

WiFried
What is EHS?
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Re: MRI and EHS

Marc Martin
Administrator
> What is EHS?

That's just one of the many names / acronyms used for this condition -- Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity Syndrome.
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Re: MRI and EHS

ED.vs.EMR
In reply to this post by dteshome85@gmail.com
Of course everybody's body/health is different, but I'd personally have to go w/Kruse re MRIs+Dyes.  I've had at least 2-3 MRIs (1990s + early-2000s) but did not know about EMR nor ES in those days (but on SSD for CEBV + CFIDS, which some experts like Magda Havas think CFIDS is the same as ES).

The very last MRI was w/the BLUE DYE & I was literally "RUNNING INTO THE WALLS" in my small apt. for at least 3 days thereafter.  It was BAD NEWS, like a body & brain poisoning head to toe, totally messed up my ability to simply navigate the short walk from the bedroom to the kitchen (I was not on any drugs).  I kept running into the door-frame instead; plus severely spacy-head, etc.  Awful!

When I saw the Neuro again & told him about the reaction, take a guess as to his reply:  "Well, I've NEVER HEARD OF SUCH A THING!"  :-/  (And he was no Spring Chicken just starting out.)

One of those 2-3 MRIs was an fMRI (Functional MRI) Rx'd by the Immunologist who was "more protective" than the Neuro.  An fMRI supposedly does not radiate you but also does not show as much info as a regular-radiating MRI.  I don't recall any bad reaction from that.

Here's a search result from the ES Forum re prior MRI &/or w/Dye comments which may provide more variety of opinions to consider:
/ED

~~~~~~~~~~~~~
On Jan 22, 2019, at 10:15 AM, "[hidden email] [via ES]" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Curious what your experiences/thoughts are of
MRi while having sensitivity to wifi,cell phones?
Dr Kruse mentioned that With contrast the mri isn’t safe if your sensitive
[...]
 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Electrician's Daughter (ED)
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Re: MRI and EHS

casper
In reply to this post by dteshome85@gmail.com
What is the contrast agent they are using? Chuck Norris's wife was injured by gadolinium, and there are others who have been injured by this too.

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/11/22/mri-imaging-with-gbca.aspx

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Re: MRI and EHS

Fog Top
I had an MRI of the neck with no contrast in 2009 - a few years before I realized I was ES.  I felt as if I were coming unglued in the machine. It wasn't that I felt claustrophobic - it was because I could hear a constant hammering sound and felt it in my head.  When the scan was done I had trouble walking and talking and was a basketcase for an hour or more.  Perhaps it wouldn't have been so bad if it was so near my head?  You are in presence of a gigantic unnatural magnetic field in those machines.


From: casper [via ES] <ml+[hidden email]>
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 3:45 AM
To: Fog Top
Subject: [ES] Re: MRI and EHS
 
What is the contrast agent they are using? Chuck Norris's wife was injured by gadolinium, and there are others who have been injured by this too.

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/11/22/mri-imaging-with-gbca.aspx




If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
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Re: MRI and EHS

ED.vs.EMR
On Jan 22, 2019, at 11:16 PM, "Fog Top [via ES]" <[hidden email]> wrote:

...could hear a constant hammering sound...

>>I forgot about that.  The hammering, or a knocking on metal sound!

...had trouble walking and talking and was a basketcase for an hour or more.  

>>Sorry to hear that but a "comfort" to know (after 14-15 years) I wasn't the only one to have trouble walking afterward.

You are in presence of a gigantic unnatural magnetic field in those machines.

>>Saw this comment elsewhere tonight re THAT BIG MAGNET:

Jacqueline wrote in the comments at Jon Rappoport's blog on 1/22/19:
[...]

MRI originated from a chemical analysis known as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance used to identify a compound’s individual elements. Radio waves are run through a magnetic field to provide the unique resonance signature of each element of the compound. Medical applications were not available until the early 1980’s, when a large enough magnet was created to accommodate the size of the human body. The name was changed to MRI to eliminate any negative connotation associated with the word ‘nuclear’ (reference to atomic level).

It is all resonance. An understanding of the impacts of frequency upon the human body relies on a comprehensive understanding of electro-magnetic physics. It is known that blood creates a type of static electricity to move itself through the vascular system. The application of wi-fi to blood cells causes the cells to ‘stick together.’ Is this what raises the propensity for heart attack when exposed to strong wi-fi? The oxygen molecule carries a unique frequency signature; the ‘internet of things’ frequency includes that of oxygen and is known to interfere with the bonding of oxygen to red blood cells. Frequency further alters water, i.e. loss of hydrogen atom from the molecule, increased solubility propensity, and more. Your body is 70 percent water; this should be of major concern to the medical and scientific communities.

The medical field must get educated in physics – and do so quickly – to be able to properly identify and remediate symptoms associated with EMF’s, or doctors will end up killing even more people than they currently do as they erroneously attempt to treat with chemicals an issue that is purely one of ‘energy.’

[...]
Source:

/ED
~~~~~~~~~~~



Electrician's Daughter (ED)
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Re: MRI and EHS

ED.vs.EMR
In reply to this post by casper
On Jan 22, 2019, at 10:45 PM, "casper [via ES]" <[hidden email]> wrote:
What is the contrast agent they are using? 

>>Great question.  Amazed I didn't think to ask back when I had it done.

Thanks for that Mercola link re Norris' wife & MRI Dye. Very informative & good to know.  Wow, GBCA nasty stuff that can do a whammy on the CNS, Brain, Kidneys, etc.:
__(Saw this photo of them at twitter a few months back. Looking good now, both of them.)

image.jpeg

/ED

~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Electrician's Daughter (ED)
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Re: MRI and EHS

Jinna
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Re: MRI and EHS

Jinna
concerning contrast media... what could be done, what are the problems.

They only talk about 'expected reactions' such as allergy and kidney poisoning:



  "  Some patients may develop adverse reactions or side effects from substances called radiocontrast media. These substances are given to patients before an X-ray or computerized tomography (CT) scan. The substances improve the visibility of the internal organs, allowing healthcare providers to detect cancerous tumors and abnormal growths.

    There are two main types of contrast media: barium sulfate and iodine.
 Barium sulfate is a white powder that is mixed with water. The agent is most often used to help healthcare providers see the internal organs of the digestive tract, such as the intestines.
Barium sulfate is usually swallowed or administered as an enema. The substance will be excreted from the body in the feces.

    Iodine-based radiocontrast media are can be used almost anywhere in the body. They are typically injected into veins, but they may also be injected into an artery, injected into the spine, or injected into the abdomen.

    Iodine may be formulated as either an ionic compound or an organic (non-ionic) compound. Ionic compounds were developed first, and they are still widely used today. Although ionic compounds are more likely to cause side effects than organic compounds, adverse reactions are uncommon.

Organic compounds have fewer side effects because, unlike ionic compounds, they do not separate into smaller particles once they dissolve in water. This means the concentration of particles dissolved in a fluid, also called osmolality, is one-half that of ionic agents.

Substances with higher osmolality are more likely to cause adverse reactions.


    Adverse reactions from radiocontrast media are rare and symptoms can range from mild to life threatening.

Serious side effects include an anaphylaxis-like reaction and kidney damage.

Normally, anaphylaxis reactions are allergic reactions that involve the immune system. When anaphylaxis reactions occur in response to radiocontrast media, the immune system is not involved.

Therefore, it is not considered true anaphylaxis.

Kidney damage may occur because the kidneys must break down the radiocontrast media.


    Radiocontrast media should not be given to patients who have experienced adverse reactions in the past because they have an increased risk of experiencing reactions in the future.$

    Treatment for adverse reactions depends on the type and severity of symptoms.

Commonly used treatments include electrical cardioversion, epinephrine, hemodialysis, isotonic fluid, and supplemental oxygen."


from http://www.livingnaturally.com/ns/DisplayMonograph.asp?StoreID=3ED1FF6A18BD42979FFF73C8E8CD4512&DocID=allergy-radiocontrastmedia
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Re: MRI and EHS

Jinna
As for Gadolinum, the FDA changed the way it used to see it...

Now they admitted that gadolinum (barium sulfate) stays in the body and is not excreted.

This article is from july 2018

“The FDA issued a Drug Safety Communication warning that Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are in fact retained in the body. As part of the warning, new class warnings are required.”

https://shakedlaw.com/2018/07/23/gadolinium/
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Re: MRI and EHS

ninipooh
In reply to this post by dteshome85@gmail.com
Read the Mercury Detox Manual by Andy Culter (Get the NEW book). This is the safest protocol to use to remove heavy metals which is sometimes confused with MS, Parkinsons, psychosis etc. Everyone has heavy metals some more than others which is why some are more chemically or EHS.
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Re: MRI and EHS

Marc Martin
Administrator
On January 23, "ninipooh [via ES]" <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Read the Mercury Detox Manual by Andy Culter (Get the NEW book). This is the
> safest protocol to use to remove heavy metals

The Cutler protocol is not the safest protocol, as evidenced by the many people who
were unable to complete it (including Culter himself), and the many people who never
got better from it or even got worse from it (myself included).  

The "safest protocol" is dependent on the individual, depending on what sorts of
metals have accumulated within them, which chelators they can tolerate, and how
well their kidneys and liver are working.

Many people who abandoned the Cutler protocol as unsafe moved onto
other things, based on the work of Dr. Chris Shade, Dr. Boyd Haley,
Dr. Dietrich Klinghart, or others.

Marc
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Re: MRI and EHS

dteshome85@gmail.com
I am curious guys if you think

It is worth it/safe to get an MRI

Without the contrast.My

obamacare runs out in March

and i was looking into options

Of moving to a low emf zone.

As my parents will be moving

Closer to the airport

Before i do that i am wondering

If its necessary to know if may

Have nuerodegenerative condition

Like multiple sclerosis or

something similar.A friend

Of mine who has MS and is not

overly sensitive to emf thinks that

I may have it and should gather

Evidence before moving to

somewhere like green bank?

I would regret if i moved

somewhere and then never

sought diagnosis for a potential

Nuero condition and at the same

Time i have some concerns about

A general MRi of the brain without

Contrast

My friend got MS while living in

the Mountains of west virginia

with very little emf around

Thank you for the feedback guys and gals