Innerspring Mattress

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
15 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Innerspring Mattress

ESther
Is there any way to shield an innerspring mattress by itself, such as wrapping some kind of shielding material around it?

I just bought a new organic latex mattress, and to my dismay it has caused an aggravation of a very old tailbone injury and some fibromyalgia trigger points. I'm in pain all the time now. I've exchanged layers for different firmness, etc., but it hasn't helped.  So two nights ago, I dragged out an air mattress and have been using that.  It helps if it's inflated to the exact firmness, but I do have MCS and am not crazy about sleeping on vinyl as a long-term solution.  

I tried out a wool bed, but it was very hard.  The wool eventually compacts, and doesn't provide a balancing of body weight.  I think that is the problem with the latex, too.  The heaviest part of my body (hips) sinks into the latex (even if the layer is hard), putting pressure onto my lower spine and tail bone, and the latex is "pushing back" (resistance) on my FM hip trigger points, causing pain.

Anyway, if it's possible to shield an innerspring mattress, I think that might be the best solution for me.  I wouldn't use a box spring; just the mattress.

Any thoughts?

Thanks,

Esther

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

C.a.b. Johnson
-- On Wed, 1/4/12, Esther <[hidden email]>













 

   
     
     
      Is there any way to shield an innerspring mattress by itself, such as wrapping some kind of shielding material around it?

Anyway, if it's possible to shield an innerspring mattress, I think
that might be the best solution for me. I wouldn't use a box spring;
just the mattress.


Any thoughts?
************************************************************
Hi Esther,

I have some thoughts.  I have had mattress issues for so long I can't tell ya.  Mostly because of allergies to the materials, and recently because of the metal.  I have tried almost every kind of mattress.  Could not stand the smells from the organic cotton, futon, latex, foam, or even most inner spring mattresses since they have fire retardant, foam and other materials in them that bother me. 

The expensive camping air mattresses that blow themself up and are made of a gortex type fabric don't bother me MCS wise, they have no metal in them, and are surprisingly comfortable.  They are good for using in sticky situations until you find the mattress you want.  Good to take travelling or to sleep overs, and of course, camping, if you buy a good one.

But, I finally found a non-metal mattress I can use with my beautiful burlwood antique bed.  I got rid of the inner spring mattress and was looking at an empty bed frame for over a year, wondering if I should sell the bed and sleep on the floor permanently.  But I do not like sleeping on the floor because of electrical wires that may be running underneath the floor. 

Then a friend of mine wanted to sell a Sleep Number bed for cheap.  So I bought it.  It is like a large air mattress surrounded by foam blocks.  It has an air pump connected to it that allows you to adjust the air in the mattress to suit your choice of firmness.  Once you do that, you can unplug it and not worry about any EMF's near the bed. And, there is not a stitch of metal in it which is exactly what I was after. 

Of course, I was afraid I would react to the foam.  So I took the foam blocks out and aired them out for 6 months.  Then I put them back in the bed - zipped it all up and covered the mattress with an expensive dust mite cover that I got at a garage sale. It encloses the whole mattress in a zip case.  Then I put two more fitted sheets over that, then the regular sheets. 

The thing about the dust mite allergy mattress cover is that it is made of special fabric that has an average pore size of 2.8 microns so that even the smallest allergens like cat
                and dog dander, which are about 6 microns, cannot pass through it.  This small pore size also makes it a good barrier against odors from whatever might be in the mattress.

Go here:
http://www.achooallergy.com/mattress-covers.asp
Make sure to get a non-membrane type.

Anyway, the Sleep Number bed may just well be the next best thing to an inner spring mattress for those of us wanting to get rid of the metal in our beds.  They are comfortable, and the same size as the inner spring mattress so you do not have to change your bed frame, or your normal bedding supplies.  I was lucky to get this stuff cheap.  It is expensive if you are purchasing retail.  Now, I just need to get a canopy or build a faraday cage around my bed so I can sleep in it.

So I say get rid of the inner spring mattress and try the gortex air mattress or the Sleep Number mattress.

C. Johnson
[hidden email]
Wireless Refugee


 











 





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

Marc Martin
Administrator
In reply to this post by ESther
> Anyway, if it's possible to shield an innerspring mattress

Yes, my wife rejected a latex matress because it caused her
back pains (and also didn't dissipate body heat well).
So as a workaround, I bought a 3" latex topper to put on my
side of the bed (which increases the distance from my
body to the metal springs a bit), and also put a grounding
sheet at the foot of the bed to attract some of the EMFs
from a nearby space heater.  I think both of these help a bit,
but I still slept better with the all-latex mattress.

Marc
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

KathyB
In reply to this post by C.a.b. Johnson

The old sleep number might work


The problem now with  sleep number bed's are the remote control is same frequency of a blue tooth. 419 Mhz. ,


Thanks for the dust mite cover.

Kathy

From: C.a.b. Johnson <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [eSens] Innerspring Mattress
To: [hidden email]
Date: Wednesday, January 4, 2012, 6:33 AM
















 



 


   
     
     
      --



Anyway, the Sleep Number bed may just well be the next best thing to an inner spring mattress for those of us wanting to get rid of the metal in our beds.  They are comfortable, and the same size as the inner spring mattress so you do not have to change your bed frame, or your normal bedding supplies.  I was lucky to get this stuff cheap.  It is expensive if you are purchasing retail.  Now, I just need to get a canopy or build a faraday cage around my bed so I can sleep in it.



So I say get rid of the inner spring mattress and try the gortex air mattress or the Sleep Number mattress.



C. Johnson

[hidden email]

Wireless Refugee



 



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





   
     

   
   






 










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

ESther
In reply to this post by C.a.b. Johnson
Thanks, C.  I've been wondering about the Sleep Number bed for quite a  
while, but rejected it b/c of the non-organic covering and synthetic  
foam blocks.  Your description of what you've done to deal with those  
issues is very helpful, and is getting me to considering them again.  
Maybe I could even cut up my latex mattress into blocks and use those  
for the foam. I'd seen those allergy mattress covers before, but  
assumed they wouldn't block the chemical smell.  Good to know it seems  
to be working for you.

Just curious, when I was researching them several years ago, I found  
some comments about there being a problem with black mold developing  
on the rubber air bladder, which was found when the owners had  
disassembled the bed to move.  Have you ever checked yours for that?  
I live in a very damp climate.

I appreciate the info on the gortex beds.  Is that the Aerobed?  A  
friend who has MCS said she wasn't very bothered by the aerobeds after  
they'd been off-gassed a bit.  I know most of them are self-
inflating.  Do you know if the mechanism that does the inflating has  
metal in it?  If so, did it cause a problem for you?

Thanks,
Esther


On Jan 4, 2012, at 4:33 AM, C.a.b. Johnson wrote:

> -- On Wed, 1/4/12, Esther <[hidden email]>
>
> Is there any way to shield an innerspring mattress by itself, such  
> as wrapping some kind of shielding material around it?
>
> Anyway, if it's possible to shield an innerspring mattress, I think
> that might be the best solution for me. I wouldn't use a box spring;
> just the mattress.
>
> Any thoughts?
> ************************************************************
> Hi Esther,
>
> I have some thoughts.  I have had mattress issues for so long I  
> can't tell ya.  Mostly because of allergies to the materials, and  
> recently because of the metal.  I have tried almost every kind of  
> mattress.  Could not stand the smells from the organic cotton,  
> futon, latex, foam, or even most inner spring mattresses since they  
> have fire retardant, foam and other materials in them that bother me.
>
> The expensive camping air mattresses that blow themself up and are  
> made of a gortex type fabric don't bother me MCS wise, they have no  
> metal in them, and are surprisingly comfortable.  They are good for  
> using in sticky situations until you find the mattress you want.  
> Good to take travelling or to sleep overs, and of course, camping,  
> if you buy a good one.
>
> But, I finally found a non-metal mattress I can use with my  
> beautiful burlwood antique bed.  I got rid of the inner spring  
> mattress and was looking at an empty bed frame for over a year,  
> wondering if I should sell the bed and sleep on the floor  
> permanently.  But I do not like sleeping on the floor because of  
> electrical wires that may be running underneath the floor.
>
> Then a friend of mine wanted to sell a Sleep Number bed for cheap.  
> So I bought it.  It is like a large air mattress surrounded by foam  
> blocks.  It has an air pump connected to it that allows you to  
> adjust the air in the mattress to suit your choice of firmness.  
> Once you do that, you can unplug it and not worry about any EMF's  
> near the bed. And, there is not a stitch of metal in it which is  
> exactly what I was after.
>
> Of course, I was afraid I would react to the foam.  So I took the  
> foam blocks out and aired them out for 6 months.  Then I put them  
> back in the bed - zipped it all up and covered the mattress with an  
> expensive dust mite cover that I got at a garage sale. It encloses  
> the whole mattress in a zip case.  Then I put two more fitted sheets  
> over that, then the regular sheets.
>
> The thing about the dust mite allergy mattress cover is that it is  
> made of special fabric that has an average pore size of 2.8 microns  
> so that even the smallest allergens like cat
> and dog dander, which are about 6 microns, cannot pass through it.  
> This small pore size also makes it a good barrier against odors from  
> whatever might be in the mattress.
>
> Go here:
> http://www.achooallergy.com/mattress-covers.asp
> Make sure to get a non-membrane type.
>
> Anyway, the Sleep Number bed may just well be the next best thing to  
> an inner spring mattress for those of us wanting to get rid of the  
> metal in our beds.  They are comfortable, and the same size as the  
> inner spring mattress so you do not have to change your bed frame,  
> or your normal bedding supplies.  I was lucky to get this stuff  
> cheap.  It is expensive if you are purchasing retail.  Now, I just  
> need to get a canopy or build a faraday cage around my bed so I can  
> sleep in it.
>
> So I say get rid of the inner spring mattress and try the gortex air  
> mattress or the Sleep Number mattress.
>
> C. Johnson
> [hidden email]
> Wireless Refugee
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/eSens/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/eSens/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    [hidden email]
    [hidden email]

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    [hidden email]

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

ESther
In reply to this post by Marc Martin
Hi Marc.  What is a grounding sheet and how do you attach it to the  
bed?  My problem with ground with with grounding cords is that this is  
a 2-wire house, and the outlets don't have that 3rd hole.  I can put a  
3-prong adaptor in the outlet, but I don't know if that would work.  
Would it?

I had a 2" organic latex topper on my old innerspring mattress, and an  
organic wool topper on top of that.  The mattress was very firm  
(euphemism for HARD), and over the years I finally came up with that  
solution.  I tried putting either the latex topper and/or the wool  
topper on the latex bed, but it didn't have the same effect.

Esther


On Jan 4, 2012, at 6:59 AM, Marc Martin wrote:

> > Anyway, if it's possible to shield an innerspring mattress
>
> Yes, my wife rejected a latex matress because it caused her
> back pains (and also didn't dissipate body heat well).
> So as a workaround, I bought a 3" latex topper to put on my
> side of the bed (which increases the distance from my
> body to the metal springs a bit), and also put a grounding
> sheet at the foot of the bed to attract some of the EMFs
> from a nearby space heater. I think both of these help a bit,
> but I still slept better with the all-latex mattress.
>
> Marc
>



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/eSens/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/eSens/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    [hidden email]
    [hidden email]

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    [hidden email]

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

ESther
In reply to this post by KathyB
Hi Kathy,

Is the receiver for the remote built into the bed, and can it be  
disabled?

Esther


On Jan 4, 2012, at 7:23 AM, KathyB wrote:

>
> The old sleep number might work
>
> The problem now with  sleep number bed's are the remote control is  
> same frequency of a blue tooth. 419 Mhz. ,
>
> Thanks for the dust mite cover.
>
> Kathy
>
> From: C.a.b. Johnson <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: [eSens] Innerspring Mattress
> To: [hidden email]
> Date: Wednesday, January 4, 2012, 6:33 AM
>
>
>
> --
>
> Anyway, the Sleep Number bed may just well be the next best thing to  
> an inner spring mattress for those of us wanting to get rid of the  
> metal in our beds.  They are comfortable, and the same size as the  
> inner spring mattress so you do not have to change your bed frame,  
> or your normal bedding supplies.  I was lucky to get this stuff  
> cheap.  It is expensive if you are purchasing retail.  Now, I just  
> need to get a canopy or build a faraday cage around my bed so I can  
> sleep in it.
>
> So I say get rid of the inner spring mattress and try the gortex air  
> mattress or the Sleep Number mattress.
>
> C. Johnson
>
> [hidden email]
>
> Wireless Refugee
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/eSens/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/eSens/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    [hidden email]
    [hidden email]

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    [hidden email]

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

RE: Innerspring Mattress

Elizabeth thode
In reply to this post by ESther

Ester,
A two prong outlet means not grounded. The 3rd hole would have to to connect
to 3 wires INSIDE the outlet. Yes, you can put a new OUTLET cover on-
these  are called: cheaters. And many houses have this-
mine did! But when the electrician pulled removed the cover outlet-box-
guess what? Outlets only wired with 2 wires, not the 3rd, for grounding.
So no, this won't work.
But there is another way to do this. You can use a ceramic 3 gallon
planter pot. Fill with good draining soil/dirt. (This soil/dirt must not contain
too much clay- it has to drain well). Make sure there are draining holes in
bottom of planter. You will also need a shallow large bowl/container under
this planter, to catch draining water.
You also need:
one six inch piece of copper pipe 1/2 diameter.
Two alligator clips, attached to coated wiring.
A piece of fabric, like the high performance silver or the white the sell-
large enough to either cover whole top of mattress or bottom half, with
room to tuck in.
Place silver fabric UNDER the bottom sheet.
Place planter at bottom of bed-filled with dirt.
Place copper rod in center of planter, with an inch sticking out.
Connect one end of alligator clip to top of copper rod.
Connect other end of alligator clip to bottom edge of grounding
fabric.
You must keep the soil in the planter moist- not soaking, but
do not let it GO DRY. I keep a water bottle next to it, and
give it a little water most nights. Use Spring water
to water the dirt. Not Reverse Osmosis or distilled.
You want the alligator clips and wire that connects both
ends to be NO LONGER then 12 inches for it to work well.
I have used this system for 2 years with success.
Keep the copper shiny. YOu will need to keep some
Plumbers abrasive sandcloth on hand, to sand the copper
to give it a shine, every so often.
We also used the same system, with a much smaller planter
in the car, for when my daughter would get nauseated
from efm's in the car. I made a seat pad, using the
same grounding fabric on the inner layer of seat pad.
For that, you leave a seam open, so you can connect
 the alligator clip to the grounding fabric. She doesn't
need to use that one anymore. Victory!
Lizzie
 

> To: [hidden email]
> From: [hidden email]
> Date: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 01:52:16 -0800
> Subject: Re: [eSens] Innerspring Mattress
>
> Hi Marc. What is a grounding sheet and how do you attach it to the
> bed? My problem with ground with with grounding cords is that this is
> a 2-wire house, and the outlets don't have that 3rd hole. I can put a
> 3-prong adaptor in the outlet, but I don't know if that would work.
> Would it?
>
> I had a 2" organic latex topper on my old innerspring mattress, and an
> organic wool topper on top of that. The mattress was very firm
> (euphemism for HARD), and over the years I finally came up with that
> solution. I tried putting either the latex topper and/or the wool
> topper on the latex bed, but it didn't have the same effect.
>
> Esther
>
>
> On Jan 4, 2012, at 6:59 AM, Marc Martin wrote:
>
> > > Anyway, if it's possible to shield an innerspring mattress
> >
> > Yes, my wife rejected a latex matress because it caused her
> > back pains (and also didn't dissipate body heat well).
> > So as a workaround, I bought a 3" latex topper to put on my
> > side of the bed (which increases the distance from my
> > body to the metal springs a bit), and also put a grounding
> > sheet at the foot of the bed to attract some of the EMFs
> > from a nearby space heater. I think both of these help a bit,
> > but I still slept better with the all-latex mattress.
> >
> > Marc
> >
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
     

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

KathyB
In reply to this post by ESther
Esther,

I guess it could be disabled, we'd have to ask the co.  Could someome still adjust the bed w/o it?

It's a good bed, otherwise.

Kathy

From: Esther LeSieur <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [eSens] Re:  Innerspring Mattress

Hi Kathy,

Is the receiver for the remote built into the bed, and can it be 
disabled?

Esther


On Jan 4, 2012, at 7:23 AM, KathyB wrote:

>
> The old sleep number might work
>
> The problem now with  sleep number bed's are the remote control is 
> same frequency of a blue tooth. 419 Mhz (maybe off on #'s)
>
> Thanks for the dust mite cover.
>
> Kathy
>
>


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

Marc Martin
Administrator
> I guess it could be disabled, we'd have to ask the co. 
> Could someome still adjust the bed w/o it?

Also, "The Sleep Number" bed isn't the only air mattress around.
There may be other manufacturers who sell air mattresses that
don't use wireless remotes.

Marc
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

Marc Martin
Administrator
In reply to this post by ESther
> Hi Marc.  What is a grounding sheet and how do you attach it to the  
> bed?  My problem with ground with with grounding cords is that this is  
> a 2-wire house, and the outlets don't have that 3rd hole.  I can put a  
> 3-prong adaptor in the outlet, but I don't know if that would work.  
> Would it?

That won't work -- you either need a REAL 3-prong outlet that is
actually wired to the ground, or you need a wire that goes outside
and into the ground.

Grounding sheets are sold by Earthing.com (and elsewhere).  You are
supposed to have direct body contact with the sheet, but many
people here have complained that this makes their symptoms worse.
So I merely put the sheet at the foot of the bed, in between
the largest source of local EMF in my bedroom (the space heater)
and my body.  This seems to help a little.

Marc
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

C.a.b. Johnson
In reply to this post by Marc Martin
I also have a one of those air beds that you blow up with the included electric pump.  But I don't like the smell of the plastic and the sizes don't fit in miy bed frame and they are kinda large, so I don't use it.   They are good to take on trips if you are staying at someone's house for a few days but too heavy and bulky to take on a plane trip whereas the gortex mats are lighweight enough for that.

Yes, the Sleep Number Bed has a wireless remote, but you only need to use it once to adjust the firmness.  Then you just unplug the pump and don't have to use it again unless you want to adjust the firmness again.  You do not have to have the pump plugged in all the time.at all.  So I don't think the EMF's are an issue here.  This bed is not for everyone.  The foam blocks are not ideal.  ut I am trying to work with this bed.  We will see how it goes.

Like I said, those gortex covered camping air mattresses that blow themselves up are okay for temporary fixes.  They are thin - about 1 inch thick.  some are 2 inches thick.  Some of them roll up and some of them fold over in 3 halves.  The folding ones are wider, longer and more comfortable.  They are mostly sold at REI or Recreation Equipment Inc stores. 

C. Johnson
[hidden email]
Wireless Refugee

--- On Thu, 1/5/12, Marc Martin <[hidden email]> wrote:

From: Marc Martin <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [eSens] Re:  Innerspring Mattress
To: [hidden email]
Date: Thursday, January 5, 2012, 7:59 PM








 



 


   
     
     
      > I guess it could be disabled, we'd have to ask the co.  

> Could someome still adjust the bed w/o it?



Also, "The Sleep Number" bed isn't the only air mattress around.

There may be other manufacturers who sell air mattresses that

don't use wireless remotes.



Marc



   
     

   
   






 





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

C.a.b. Johnson
In reply to this post by ESther
-- On Thu, 1/5/12, Esther LeSieur <[hidden email]> wrote:


I found  some comments about there being a problem with black mold developing 

on the rubber air bladder, which was found when the owners had 

disassembled the bed to move.

Esther,

No I have not heard stories of black mold developing inside the Sleep Number bed, but I am glad you mentioned it, so that I can check periodically and air it out.  I wonder if enclosing it in an allergy zip cover would trap moisture inside?  I guess I will have to experiment and find out.  I did a search on the internet and found many articles on Sleep Number bed complaints.

Here is an exerpt from an article entitled:  "Sleep Number Bed Complaints":
http://sleep.lovetoknow.com/Sleep_Number_Bed_Complaints

"Mold: One of the most significant complaints of the
Sleep Number bed is the possibility of developing mold. The mattress
has a design with air chambers under foam layers. Over time, the
development of mold can happen between these layers. The company claims
to have redeveloped the materials to ensure mold growth does not occur.
The presence of mold spores can lead to the development of asthma in
some individuals."

I do not know if I have the redeveloped model or not.  I could not find a site with pictures of the different models. I think mine is just the basic one with no bells and whistles.

The article below rates all the complaints, with the mold complaint being the last on the list:
http://www.sleeplikethedead.com/review-sleep-number2.html

"Complaint / Problem #8: Mold
About 3% of owners say that mold is present between the foam and air
chambers. A small number of these owners report feeling ill because of
the mold. Mold / mildew problems in a Sleep Number Bed is a widely
publicized and discussed issue. However, the number of owners who have
a mold problem, or at least are aware of having such a problem, is
small based on our collected data involving 1,600 owners."
I appreciate the info on the gortex beds.  Is that the Aerobed? 

No, an Aerobed has an electric plug in pump and when it is blown up they are quite large, about the size of a real mattress.  I have an Aerobed but do not use it because I have not place to put it to off-gas.  The gortex camping air mattresses are just a mat that you can roll up.  They are about an inch or two thick.  They have a small black nozzle in the corner that you untwist,  which lets the air in.  When it is inflated, you screw the nozzle back down.  The thicker longer ones that fold in 3 are more comfortable.  They are just camping mats for temporary situations.  .

Do you know if the mechanism that does the inflating has metal in it?  If so, did it cause a problem for you?

The pump used to inflate the Sleep Number bed is plastic with a plastic tube running to the mattress bladder.  I do not see any metal.

The reason I am using a Sleep Number bed is because I got it cheap from a friend.  I am not so sure I would have paid retail for it.  From the articles I read, it sounds like these mattresses do have a few issues, which I hope I can work around.  Good luck on finding a mattress that works for you.


C. Johnson
[hidden email]
Wireless Refugee


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

ESther
Thanks, C., for the info on the gortex camping mattress!

It's good to know that mold is the last complaint on the Sleep Number  
Bed complaints.  I was just reminded that when I ordered my natural  
latex bed, I talked with the manufacturer about what kind of platform  
bed frame I should get.  She told me I had to have slats, not a solid  
platform, because latex needs to breath or it gets moldy.  I wonder if  
that applies to synthetic foam, too? I was thinking it wouldn't, but  
then I guess mold can grow anywhere.   Guess it might have something  
to do with condensation building up on the air bladder next to the  
foam.  I'm wondering if your allergy encasement cover would protect  
you even if that did happen?  I don't know if the cover would cause it  
any more than the bed's encasement.  Checking periodically sounds like  
a good idea, though a bit of a pain. Still, it sounds like you're  
doing all the workarounds to make the bed as usable you as you can,  
and I sure hope you end up with a absolutely great, comfortable bed.  
I really would love to be able to have one of those myself....

Esther


On Jan 9, 2012, at 12:33 AM, C.a.b. Johnson wrote:

>
> Esther,
>
> No I have not heard stories of black mold developing inside the  
> Sleep Number bed, but I am glad you mentioned it, so that I can  
> check periodically and air it out.  I wonder if enclosing it in an  
> allergy zip cover would trap moisture inside?  I guess I will have  
> to experiment and find out.  I did a search on the internet and  
> found many articles on Sleep Number bed complaints.
>
> Here is an exerpt from an article entitled:  "Sleep Number Bed  
> Complaints":
> http://sleep.lovetoknow.com/Sleep_Number_Bed_Complaints
>
> "Mold: One of the most significant complaints of the
> Sleep Number bed is the possibility of developing mold. The mattress
> has a design with air chambers under foam layers. Over time, the
> development of mold can happen between these layers. The company  
> claims
> to have redeveloped the materials to ensure mold growth does not  
> occur.
> The presence of mold spores can lead to the development of asthma in
> some individuals."
>
> I do not know if I have the redeveloped model or not.  I could not  
> find a site with pictures of the different models. I think mine is  
> just the basic one with no bells and whistles.
>
> The article below rates all the complaints, with the mold complaint  
> being the last on the list:
> http://www.sleeplikethedead.com/review-sleep-number2.html
>
> "Complaint / Problem #8: Mold
> About 3% of owners say that mold is present between the foam and air
> chambers. A small number of these owners report feeling ill because of
> the mold. Mold / mildew problems in a Sleep Number Bed is a widely
> publicized and discussed issue. However, the number of owners who have
> a mold problem, or at least are aware of having such a problem, is
> small based on our collected data involving 1,600 owners."
> I appreciate the info on the gortex beds.  Is that the Aerobed?
>
> No, an Aerobed has an electric plug in pump and when it is blown up  
> they are quite large, about the size of a real mattress.  I have an  
> Aerobed but do not use it because I have not place to put it to off-
> gas.  The gortex camping air mattresses are just a mat that you can  
> roll up.  They are about an inch or two thick.  They have a small  
> black nozzle in the corner that you untwist,  which lets the air  
> in.  When it is inflated, you screw the nozzle back down.  The  
> thicker longer ones that fold in 3 are more comfortable.  They are  
> just camping mats for temporary situations.  .
>
> Do you know if the mechanism that does the inflating has metal in  
> it?  If so, did it cause a problem for you?
>
> The pump used to inflate the Sleep Number bed is plastic with a  
> plastic tube running to the mattress bladder.  I do not see any metal.
>
> The reason I am using a Sleep Number bed is because I got it cheap  
> from a friend.  I am not so sure I would have paid retail for it.  
> From the articles I read, it sounds like these mattresses do have a  
> few issues, which I hope I can work around.  Good luck on finding a  
> mattress that works for you.
>
> C. Johnson
> [hidden email]
> Wireless Refugee
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/eSens/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/eSens/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    [hidden email]
    [hidden email]

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    [hidden email]

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Innerspring Mattress

DanStones
In reply to this post by ESther
You said  you suffer from pains while sleeping, so why not trying a memory foam mattress? Just avoid cheap models with toxic smell, I am not sure they are safe enough. Modern memory foam products have pain relieving properties, they provide with good support while sleeping. If you don't want buying he whole mattress (they're rather expensive, yep), you can try a topper (here's a nice review on the best models ). Grandpa used to suffer from neck pains he successfully got  rid of it precisely due to a memory foam mattress (Leesa I guess). I used to sleep on an air mattress for some period, it must be the most uncomfortable thing ever. Can't say a thing about a latex one as I am allergic to it.